Protamine-like proteins have bactericidal activity. The first evidence in Mytilus galloprovincialis

  • Rosaria Notariale Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Adriana Basile Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Elena Montana Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Nunzia Colonna Romano Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Maria Grazia Cacciapuoti Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Francesco Aliberti Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Renato Gesuele Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Francesca De Ruberto Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Sergio Sorbo Ce.S.M.A, Section of Microscopy, University of Naples Federico II, Complesso Univ. Monte Sant'Angelo, Via Cinthia 4, 80126 Napoli, Italy
  • Gian Carlo Tenore Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy.
  • Marco Guida Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
  • Katrina V. Good
  • Juan Ausió University of Victoria, Dept. of Biochemistry & Microbiology, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
  • Marina Piscopo Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0560-6952

Abstract

The major acid-soluble protein components of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm chromatin consist of the protamine-like proteins PL-II, PL-III and PL-IV, an intermediate group of sperm nuclear basic proteins between histones and protamines. The aim of this study was to investigate the bactericidal activity of these proteins since, to date, there are reports on bactericidal activity of protamines and histones, but not on protamine-like proteins. We tested the bactericidal activity of these proteins against Gram-positive bacteria: Enterococcus faecalis and two different strains of Staphylococcus aureus, as well as Gram-negative bacteria: Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhmurium, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, and Escherichia coli. Clinical isolates of the same bacterial species were also used to compare their sensitivity to these proteins. The results show that Mytilus galloprovincialis protamine-like proteins exhibited bactericidal activity against all bacterial strains tested with different minimum bactericidal concentration values, ranging from 15.7 to 250 µg/mL. Furthermore, these proteins were active against some bacterial strains tested that are resistant to conventional antibiotics. These proteins showed very low toxicity as judged by red blood cell lysis and viability MTT assays and seem to act both at the membrane level and within the bacterial cell. We also tested the bactericidal activity of the product obtained from an in vitro model of gastrointestinal digestion of protamine-like proteins on a Gram-positive and a Gram-negative strain, and obtained the same results with respect to undigested protamine-like proteins on the Gram-positive bacterium. These results provide the first evidence of bactericidal activity of protamine-like-proteins.

Author Biographies

Rosaria Notariale, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Adriana Basile, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Elena Montana, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Maria Grazia Cacciapuoti, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Francesco Aliberti, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Renato Gesuele, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Francesca De Ruberto, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Gian Carlo Tenore, Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy.
Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples "Federico II", Naples, Italy.
Marco Guida, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Juan Ausió, University of Victoria, Dept. of Biochemistry & Microbiology, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
University of Victoria, Dept. of Biochemistry & Microbiology, Victoria, British Columbia,   Canada
Marina Piscopo, Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy
Dipartimento di Biologia, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II. Napoli, Italy

References

Davide A.L. Vignati

david-anselmo.vignati@univ-lorraine.fr

LIEC - CNRS UMR 7360

UFR SciFA - Université de Lorraine - Campus Bridoux - Bât. IBISE

, rue du Général Delestraint - 57070 METZ

France

Daniela Rigano

Dipartimento di Farmacia - VIA D. MONTESANO, 49 Università di Napoli, Italy

daniela.rigano@unina.it

Caren Helbing

University of Victoria, Dept. of Biochemistry & Microbiology, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

chelbing@uvic.ca

Published
2018-11-17
Section
Articles